Weekend update

3 06 2008

Sorry about the uninspiring title, but yes this is just a weekend update.  We are in our summer training programme at the moment, which comprises training Saturday, Sunday and Monday whilst working like a beast in the evenings to keep the business going.

This weekend, Saturday looked too light to sail so after meeting in Lymington with 49er new boy Ben Paton (Ex Radial World and European Champion), we set about re packing our rudder stock, whch turned out to be the most boring job we could imagine.  The second we had ripped the old packing out (AKA the point of no return), the breeze picked up to around 6 to 8 knots.  However, without a rudder, we were stuck, so we set about re-packing the stock to sail sunday and Monday (and also re-rigging and tuning Ben’s 9er for him).
Sunday turned into the best day for sailing.  We managed 2 -3 hours in 4-8 knots, but struggled on the sail in when the wind died to zero, forcing us to beat in against a ripping 4 knot tide.  We eventually made it in with some daylight spare, so we topped the day of with an hour bike ride (a puncture forced me to go back and pick the van up halfway, so Jus could only cycle for half of it. But he did make friends with a horse in a field.  It was called Jeffery.  The horse)

Monday gave us an hour upwind sail in very light winds against another strong tide.  Again, we managed to get back in without calling our mates from the RNLI to tow us back, although it was a close thing…

Finally, we went for a high intentsity cycle to finish off the weekend.  24 miles in an hour and a half around the New Forest was enough to get us walking like drunk monkeys afteerwards, but it was great to keep the fitness levels up.  Now it’s back to work for me, and back to enjoying the sumer (rain) for Jus.  ( I hate uni students, now that I’m not one anymore..)





Jesus christ lads, you were hooning it!

31 10 2007

Just remebered a story from training in Lymington a few weeks back.

It was a breezy day, withnice big waves and huge gusts rolling down the solent. We went out and trained for around 2 hours. On the last leg, we got the kite up, hit the straps and screamed downwind through the waves, taking off on each on. We gybe dropped to finish the session, and sailed in. On the shore, we were getting the sails down outside of the RNLI station, when a grisled RNLI crewman came out with a huge grin on his face.

“Jesus christ lads! We saw you sailing in. You were hooning it!”

Not sure what hooning it means, but I have a feeling he may be referring to our tendancy to take off at top speed. Thanks mister RNLI man sir, much appreciated.